5 SURVIVAL TIPS FOR OUTBREAK OR PANDEMIC OF CORONAVIRUS. #PREPPERS #SURVIVALKIT #CORONVIRUS

5 SURVIVAL TIPS FOR OUTBREAK OR PANDEMIC OF CORONAVIRUS. #PREPPERS #SURVIVALKIT #CORONVIRUS

Some things to add on to your emergency food supply
By adding some extras to your supply you can make it healthier and better balanced, and you can also make it fit your needs. I have added a huge amount of fruits, vegetables, eggs, and milk to my supply because we tend to eat a lot of that right now. If you generally eat low-carb, you may want to skip the pre-made buckets, and create your own kits from some of the options below.

Freeze-Dried Meat Assortment
Freeze-Dried Ground Beef
Freeze-Dried Vegetable Assortment
Egg Powder
Milk Powder
Cheddar Cheese Powder
Butter Powder
Fruits and Vegetables
Gentle Laxative
Multivitamin
And for the love of all things cute and fluffy….get one of these bucket openers and make your life easier!!!!
While waiting for your buckets, head to the grocery store and grab some of the following:
Canned fruits and veggies
Instant oatmeal
Breakfast cereal
Apple sauce
Peanut butter
Crackers
100% Juice
Coffee and/or tea
Rice
Pasta
Canned beans
Canned meats like tuna, chicken, and ham
Some of your family’s favorite snack foods to squirrel away and bring out when food fatigue sets in
However you opt to build your food supply, please don’t hesitate. If a worst-case scenario occurred, the minimum goal is to be able to feed your family for at least a month.
How much do emergency food do you need?
There are a few different ways to calculate food storage, but I find breaking it down by serving size to be the most practical. Don’t rely on what a package calls a serving size – consider the appetites of your family. You might have a couple of big eaters and a couple of people with birdlike appetites. The lists below are based on serving sizes for an average adult.
Be sure to get a variety of different foods:
3 protein servings
5-8 fruits and vegetables
5 starchy carbohydrates
On a 2000 calorie per day diet, strictly based on long-term storage food, the LDS (Church of the Latter Day Saints) says the average adult would need the following amounts for 30 days:
5 pounds of beans
25 pounds of grains
5 pounds of sugars
2 pounds of fats
8 pounds of dairy
These are purely subjective numbers, however. For example, if your family is gluten-free, you might eat more protein and produce than starchy carbs. You must take into account your family’s health concerns, special needs, allergies, intolerances, likes, and dislikes. These are simply guidelines. Try to stick as close to your normal eating habits as possible, to lessen the stress of an already highly-wrought situation. You’d be asking for trouble if you took someone who generally eats paleo and started feeding them nothing but oatmeal and vegetarian pasta dishes.
It’s also important to consider cooking times. If you never ever cook from scratch, will you suddenly want to make pots of beans and homemade bread? If the power goes out, will you have a way that you’ll be able to cook these foods? (This little stove can be used anywhere, indoors or outdoors. Be sure to stock up on extra fuel for it.)
You don’t have to be a prepper to build a 30-day food supply.
Up until recently, preppers have had something of a bad name in the media. However, as disasters strike America over and over, people are beginning to see the value in the way we do things. It’s been proven time and time again that when issues occur, you’re completely on your own.